Career Solutions hosting multi-employer job fair Tuesday

The Goodwill Career Solutions center in Dickson will host a multi-employer job fair next week with positions available in Dickson, Hickman, Williamson, Davidson and Maury counties. The job fair will be 11 am-2 pm Tuesday at the center at 543 Highway 46 S. next door to the Goodwill store. Cracker Barrel is seeking 22 cooks, dishwashers, servers, cashiers and hosts/hostesses for its Dickson location. Starting pay range is $2.13-$11 an hour depending on position and the purchase of a uniform is required. Home Instead Senior Care is seeking to fill 20 caregiver positions in Dickson, Fairview, Centerville, Bellevue, Columbia and Franklin. Starting pay is $9.25 an hour. Other employers such as Triumph Care are expected to participate. Applicants should bring a resume, photo identification and Social Security card or birth certificate and dress for on-site interviews. For more information on Tuesday’s job fair or other services at Career Solutions center, call 615-740-1217.

Dickson Habitat begins building 31st home Saturday

The Dickson Division of Habitat for Humanity will begin construction on its 31st home in Dickson County Saturday morning. Future Habitat homeowner Elisabeth Creech will drive the first nail at 7:30 am. Work will continue over the next four weekends before Creech and her two children will get to move in to their new home on Melrose Drive. An Illinois native, Creech followed her father to Tennessee after his retirement. She says she enjoys the calmer atmosphere of Dickson County compared to Chicago. Creech works for Asurion and is a single mother of two. She has taken homeownership classes and will be working on the build site with her sponsors and volunteers. After the family was accepted into the Habitat program, her daughter was asked what she was most thankful for. She simply replied, “Our home.” Dickson Habitat division Director Jeff Bennett said the mission of Habitat is to provide affordable housing to qualified families. “Our primary goal is to provide life-changing opportunities to individuals who will learn the necessary skills to budget their finances, acquire the confidence to construct their own home and ultimately build a personal nest egg that can be passed down to future generations,” Bennett said. “Our vision is to break the cycle of financial instability and help individuals experience true freedom through quality and affordable homeownership.” Through sponsors, donations, grants and volunteer labor, Habitat for Humanity provides homes with a zero-percent mortgage for qualified families. Sponsors for the Habitat build for the Creech family are Armstrong Hardwood Flooring, David and Martha Shepard, Dickson First United Methodist Church, Fellowship Sunday School Class at First United Methodist Church, First Farmers and Merchants Bank, First Federal Bank, Greater Nashville Association of Realtors – Dickson Chapter, GrindersEdge, High Noon Rotary Club of Dickson, Middle Tennessee Lumber, Porcelain Industries, Shirley and Stuart Speyer Family Fund of the Community Foundation of Middle Tennessee, U.S. Bank and United Way of Dickson County. The Dickson Habitat for Humanity was founded in 1994 by the Dickson County Ministerial Fellowship. For more information on Habitat for Humanity, contact the Dickson office at 615-441-9967 or visit habitatnashville.org.

Speigner awarded FCE clubs’ Crockarell scholarship

Dickson County FCE Council Treasurer Sunnye McKeel presents the 2016 Madeline H. Crockarell Scholarship to Tennessee Tech student Amber Speigner along with FCE Council President Alice Poole (left) and FCE Council Public Relations Leader Ann Luther (right).
Dickson County FCE Council Treasurer Sunnye McKeel presents the 2016 Madeline H. Crockarell Scholarship to Tennessee Tech student Amber Speigner along with FCE Council President Alice Poole (left) and FCE Council Public Relations Leader Ann Luther (right).

Tennessee Tech student Amber Speigner has been selected for the 2016 Madeline H. Crockarell Scholarship awarded by the Dickson County Family and Community Education Clubs. The $1,000 scholarship is awarded annually to a college junior or senior majoring in a Family and Consumer Sciences discipline. Speigner is majoring in Child Development and Family Relations at Tech in Cookeville. In her nomination, one of Speigner’s professors says she expresses a sincere desire to make a difference in the lives of children and families. Speigner says she wants to work in the field of foster care and adoption. The scholarship is presented in memory of Crockarell, who served as an extension home economics agent in Dickson County 1972-86. In partnership with UT Extension, the mission of Family and Community Education clubs is to strengthen individuals, families and communities through education, leadership development and community service. For more information on FCE clubs in Dickson County, call Extension Director Janet Cluck at 615-446-2788.

Creek Wood hosts Loretto, Cougars head to Paris tonight

Creek Wood looks to extend its two-game winning streak while Dickson County makes the longest trip of the year still looking for its first region win tonight. The 3-4 Red Hawks are playing their sixth home game in seven weeks as winless Loretto comes to Charlotte for a non-region contest. Class 4A Creek Wood thrashed the Class 2A Mustangs 60-21 in a driving rain last year. After a 31-14 loss to Hickman County last week, Loretto comes into tonight’s game 0-7 and averaging 12.4 points per game while giving up 34. With back-to-back wins over East Hickman and Hillwood, the Red Hawks are back in the playoff picture. Creek Wood is scoring 31 points an outing while giving up 39.6 per game. Creek Wood and Loretto kick off at 7:30 pm in Charlotte. Dickson County has lost five straight and an 0-4 record has the Cougars in the Region 7-5A basement with West Creek. Henry County is 4-2 overall, having the week-two game with Houston called because of lightning and not rescheduled. The Patriots are tied for first with Centennial at 4-0 in the region as the two teams will meet in the final week of the season. Dickson County must win its last three region games against Henry County, Clarksville and West Creek to have any hope of getting one of the four playoff spots. Henry County pounded Northeast 45-7 and Rossview 31-6 and has given up only 22 points through four region games. The Cougars fell to the Eagles 55-47 and the Hawks 38-35 on a controversial last-second field goal. Dickson County’s high-scoring offense ranks first overall in Region 7 (263 points), but in region games the Cougars are fourth (136) behind Henry County (159), Brentwood (147) and Centennial (145). The Cougar defense has given up the most points overall (320) and in region games (194). Dickson County and Henry County kick off at 7 pm in Paris. Cougars-Patriots will broadcast on WDKN1260AM and stream at wdkn.com and the WDKN app. Red Hawks-Mustangs will broadcast on 101.5 The One FM and stream at 1015theone.com and the RFC Sports app.

Donegan gets 10 years for lying to police, drug charges

Jamey Earl Donegan
Jamey Earl Donegan

The man who tried to extort money from a murder victim’s family and told police he was asked to provide an alibi for the suspect is headed to prison with a 10-year sentence. 45-year-old Jamey Earl Donegan of Old Stage Road pleaded no contest to a charge of fabricating evidence and guilty to drug and vandalism charges in Dickson County Circuit Court Monday. In a plea agreement, Donegan received four different sentences to run concurrently with the longest being 10 years. For his no contest plea to fabricating evidence, Donegan received a four-year sentence with a $50 fine and court costs. For a guilty plea to sale of a schedule II drug, Donegan got a six-year sentence with a $1,000 fine and court costs. For a guilty plea to initiating the process to manufacture methamphetamine, Donegan received a 10-year sentence with a $1,000 fine and court costs. For his guilty plea to vandalism, Donegan was sentenced to 11 months 29 days with a hearing scheduled for Jan. 25 to determine restitution for damaging a sprinkler head and flooding his cell at the Dickson County Jail. Four other drug charges were dismissed in the plea agreement. Donegan was classified as a range I offender, meaning he will be eligible for parole after serving 30 percent, which is three years. Donegan was given credit for almost six months he has been in jail since his March 25 arrest. Asked to recite the factual basis for the fabricating evidence charge, District Attorney Ray Crouch Jr. said Donegan called a co-defendant who pretended to be the killer of 27-year-old John Christopher Goldtrap and 23-year-old Lisa Wade Mackenzie McDonald to Goldtrap’s father. Donegan offered to kill that person for money. Defense attorney Tim Potter took issue with Crouch’s statement because Donegan already served a six-month sentence after pleading guilty to attempted theft for the extortion attempt. In fighting Potter’s motion to dismiss the fabrication charge, Crouch argued it was based on Donegan’s statement to investigators that Kenneth Ray and Bobbie Ann Niles had asked him to provide an alibi for the night Goldtrap and McDonald were shot to death. In a call monitored by police, Bobbie Ann Niles denied asking anything of Donegan. Kenneth Ray Niles of Reeves Street is charged with the murders and faces the death penalty if convicted at a trial still to be scheduled. In November, 32-year-old Joshua Michael Pickering of Firetower Road pleaded guilty to fabricating evidence and was sentenced to three years. Pickering admitted he pretended to be the killer in a call with Goldtrap’s father set up by Donegan. At a May bond hearing, Donegan testified he has at least 30 prior criminal convictions. As he was led from court to begin serving his 10-year sentence, Donegan said “thank you” to the district attorney.

Man admits touching 10-month-old with hot lighter

Matthew Edward Jacob
Matthew Edward Jacob

A Dickson man pleaded guilty to five counts of child abuse for touching a hot lighter to a 10-month-old child. 33-year-old Matthew Edward Jacob of Pond Road faces 2-12 years in prison and up to a $5,000 fine on each of the class D felonies when he is sentenced in January. In entering his guilty pleas Monday, Jacob told Judge Suzanne Lockert-Mash he was teaching the child not to touch the lighter because it might be hot and did not cause serious injury. District Attorney Ray Crouch Jr. said Jacob heated the top of the lighter and touched it to the child five times in July 2013 and confirmed the child suffered no serious physical injuries. Jacob originally was indicted in August 2013 on a single charge of aggravated child abuse of a child under 8 years old, which is a class A felony punishable by 15-60 years in prison and a fine up to $50,000. A superseding indictment in May 2015 changed the charge to five counts of child abuse or neglect of a child less than 8 years old, a class D felony. Assistant Public Defender Josh Turnbow said Jacob is pleading guilty to the indictment and going to a hearing to determine his sentence. Lockert-Mash ordered a pre-sentencing report and scheduled the sentencing hearing Jan. 23. If Jacob is determined to be a range I offender, he faces 2-4 years in jail on each count, while range II would be 4-8 years and range III is 8-12 years. A variety of factors can determine what range an offender is classified, including criminal history, the vulnerability of the victim, the level of cruelty in the crime, severity of injuries and others. There also are specific factors the judge uses to determine whether the defendant is eligible for all or part of the sentence to be suspended to probation and whether the sentences for multiple offenses will be concurrent or consecutive. Jacob has been in jail for more than three years since his arrest July 16, 2013.

Resolution pledges White Bluff, park will work together

The White Bluff Town Council passed a resolution pledging to work with nearby Montgomery Bell State Park to enhance the lives of area residents. During Tuesday’s meeting, the council unanimously approved the resolution of “collaborative effort and support” between the town and park. Submitted by park Manager Pat Wright, the resolution says the town and park “mutually pledge and resolve to work together to enhance the lives of residents through promoting healthy lifestyles, environmental education, job creation and economic growth.” Mayor Linda Hayes said the town is blessed to have the 3,700-acre state park nearby. “We’re always saying that we don’t take advantage of our park as much as we should. We encourage our citizens and everyone to do it and I think it’s one of the most-visited state parks in Tennessee. They work very well with us. If we have certain events, they’re always willing to let us give those out to the campers,” Hayes said. The ceremonial resolution does not commit the town to any expenses or specific events other than a pledge to work together with the park and to “recognize the many positive impacts of Montgomery Bell State Park.” Also at Tuesday night’s brief meeting, the council approved on second reading the rezoning of property purchased by Interstate Packaging at the corner of Old Charlotte and Pleasant View roads from residential to light industrial and approved a list of surplus equipment to be sold on govdeals.com. The list includes 2002 and 2003 Ford Crown Victoria patrol cars, a 1985 Chevrolet Blazer, a John Deere Gator, a three-quarter ton cargo trailer, four wheels for a military Hummer, a street sweeper and a generator. Police Chief Mike Holman said once the equipment is sold, the department will use the proceeds to purchase a used Prius to add to its fleet.

Main Street Festival features music, food, quilts and more

main street 16The 12th annual Main Street Festival in White Bluff features live entertainment, food, vendor booths and a quilt show on Saturday. The free event will be noon-6 pm along the stretch of Main Street from Highway 70 to the railroad tracks. At Tuesday night’s White Bluff Town Council meeting, Councilwoman Martha Beth Harding reported more than 50 vendors have signed up for booth space with more coming in and space still available. Vendors include a variety of foods as well as handmade jewelry, home décor, pottery, flowers and plants, craft items and much more. Food ranges from funnel cakes and other sweets to a variety of fried delights, from barbecue to the always popular jambalaya. Harding said the entertainment stage will be moved this year from the end of the street to the lot next to the alley so it will be more at the middle point of the block. The entertainment lineup includes Crossroads at 12 pm, Bluff House Concert series host Templeton Thompson at 1 pm, Vibe Dance Company at 2 pm, Roadside at 3 pm, former Texaco Country Showdown state winner Jonathan Wells at 4 pm and Halftime at 5 pm. Comprised of J.P. Pilkinton, Darick Wall, Joey Sullivan and Torey Sellers, Halftime was recently featured at the Dickson County Fair and a showcase at Plush on 2nd Avenue during CMA Fest in 2015. The Courthouse Quilters Guild will be hosting a quilt show Friday and Saturday at White Bluff Church of Christ. This year’s show features quilts inspired from the Bible. The quilt show will be 10 am-6 pm Friday and 10 am-3 pm Saturday. There also will be drawings for prizes. Mayor Linda Hayes urged everyone to bring a lawn chair or blanket to enjoy the festival. The Main Street Festival is presented by the White Bluff Parks and Recreation Board. For more information, contact White Bluff Town Hall at 615-797-3131.

12th Touch a Truck is 10-2 Saturday at Buckner Park

The yuke from Vulcan Materials is a popular feature at Touch a Truck. (photo courtesy Dickson Parks and Recreation Department Facebook page)
The yuke from Vulcan Materials is a popular feature at Touch a Truck. (photo courtesy Dickson Parks and Recreation Department Facebook page)

The Dickson Parks and Recreation Department is hosting its 12th annual Touch a Truck Saturday at J. Dan Buckner Park. The free event will be 10 am-2 pm in the upper parking lot near ballfields 4, 5 and 6. The annual event offers kids of all ages a chance to see and experience a variety of working vehicles. Local emergency agencies, construction companies, quarry operations, farm equipment sales and others will be bringing vehicles for display. Children will have the opportunity to see the vehicles up close and even climb inside to sit in the driver’s seat. Vehicles will include a police patrol car, fire truck, ambulance, farm tractors, sanitation truck, crane, dump trucks, school bus, utility vehicles, construction vehicles, excavator, wrecker and a yuke from Vulcan Materials. Past Touch a Truck events have included medical helicopters when they are available and weather conditions allow. Concessions will be available. For more information on the 12th annual Touch a Truck, contact the Dickson Parks and Recreation Department at 615-446-1721.

Bond revoked for driver in wreck that killed Akers

Jacob Akers (from Facebook)
Jacob Akers (from Facebook)

The man charged in the 2014 wreck that killed a medical student from Charlotte will await his trial in jail. A judge revoked the bond of 36-year-old Johnny Morgan Dye for failing to comply with his bond conditions regarding monthly drug screens. The district attorney’s office announced it plans to present evidence of possible forging of a drug screen report to the grand jury. Dye is charged with vehicular homicide by intoxication and vehicular homicide by recklessness for the July 7, 2014, wreck on Highway 49 that killed 22-year-old Jacob T. Akers. At a hearing in Dickson County Circuit Court Monday, Assistant District Attorney Jack Arnold said Dye did not submit required drug screen reports for June, July and August until a motion to revoke his bond was filed last month. DA’s office investigator John Ethridge testified the drug screen report faxed to the DA’s office for Sept. 29, 2015, is different from the report issued by Cookeville Medical Center. The report sent to the DA’s office shows Dye tested negative for methadone. But Ethridge said a copy of the original report issued by Cookeville Medical Center shows Dye tested positive for methadone. Ethridge said the Tennessee controlled substance database shows Dye having prescriptions for Hydrocodone and Oxycodone, but not for methadone. On the witness stand Monday, Dye produced records from Crossroads Treatment Center in Georgia showing a prescription for methadone. But Arnold argued none of Dye’s other drug screens turned up positive for methadone, Hydrocodone or Oxycodone. Dye, who walked with a cane at Monday’s hearing, said he fills the prescriptions for the painkillers but does not take them and “destroys” the pills. Cookeville Medical Center Chief Operating Officer Natasha Jain testified the Sept. 29, 2015, report showing Dye tested negative for methadone is “obviously forged.” Dye testified he did not alter the report and does not know who did. He said he gives the reports to his girlfriend or her mother to fax. Before Dye took the witness stand, Judge Suzanne Lockert-Mash cautioned defense attorney Olin Baker that she is considering the “probability of tampering with a court document.” Arnold asked the judge if she is considering contempt charges for altering the report to hold off because the state plans to seek an indictment when the grand jury meets in November. The judge said it is obvious that Dye did not comply with the conditions of his bond by failing to turn in reports for June, July and August when it was “incumbent on him” to make sure those reports were received. As for the altered report, Lockert-Mash said the defendant had access to change it and is the only person who would benefit from the forgery. She said she has concerns that other reports might have been doctored. Lockert-Mash revoked Dye’s bond and ordered him held until his Nov. 21 trial. Dye, who said he lives in Clarkrange, was living in Charlotte at the time of the wreck. In a previous hearing, a witness testified Dye’s Dodge pickup was traveling at a high rate of speed when he passed on double-yellow lines on Highway 49 shortly before he hit Akers’ 2005 Dodge Magnum head-on. Blood tests taken after the wreck showed Fentanyl, Oxycodone, Hydrocodone and amphetamine in Dye’s system. Akers had just graduated from Lipscomb University with a degree in molecular biology and was preparing to enter medical school at Lincoln Memorial University with plans to be a hospitalist. Just three days prior to the wreck, he proposed to his girlfriend and got engaged.